The University of Queensland Homepage
Go to the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury & Health  Homepage You are at the Centre of Clinical Research Excellence in Spinal Pain, Injury & Health  website


 Professor Bill Vicenzino




Professor Bill Vicenzino
e-mail: b.vicenzino@uq.edu.au

Chief Investigator, CCRE Spine
Head of the Division of Physiotherapy
Chair in Sports Physiotherapy
Professor Bill Vicenzino, BPhty, GradDipSportsPhty, MSc, PhD
 
 

Contact: 
 
Professor Bill Vicenzino
Room 822, Level 8
Therapies Building 84a
CCRE Spine
School of Health and Rehab Sciences
The University of Queensland
Brisbane  Qld  4072

Tel: (07) 3365 2781
Intl: +61 7 3365 2781

Fax: (07) 3365 2775
Intl: +61 7 3365 2775

E-mail: b.vicenzino@uq.edu.au  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Short Biography
 

Bill is the newly appointed Chair of Sports Physiotherapy and Head of the Division of Physiotherapy in the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Queensland. The establishment of the new Chair in Sports Physiotherapy is recognition of the future demands that will be placed on this field as the population ages and younger people undergo less incidental physical activity in their formative years. Sport and physical activity is an important area of health and well being with research required to help develop the knowledge base of the most effective ways to manage, treat and prevent injury.

Since graduating in 1980, Bill has worked in musculoskeletal and sports physiotherapy, mainly in private practice. During studying for his Sports and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy qualifications he developed a particular interest in the underpinning evidence for physical therapies – which ones work, why and how? His PhD (2000) focused on mechanisms of spinal manipulative therapy and resulted in publication of an evidenced based theoretical model for this physical treatment.

Lately his clinical research has focused on treatments for tennis elbow and neck pain, and the evidence supporting in-shoe orthotics versus manual therapy and exercise in the management of anterior knee pain. For example, a recently completed randomised clinical trial (RCT) funded by the NHMRC and published in the BMJ has shown that an active physiotherapy treatment of joint manipulation and exercise is on the whole better than steroid injections. His team is currently completing another NHMRC funded RCT into the use of orthoses in anterior knee pain whilst commencing an ARC linkage project that is seeking to better understand the role of both exercise (cross training) and physical therapies such as tape and orthoses on neuromuscular control of the leg and foot. This project is a collaborative effort with the AIS and several international researchers/laboratories and includes a team of 4 PhD scholars and a post-doctoral fellow. His research since his PhD has been supported by approximately $4.1M in competitive research grants.

Bill has communicated his findings from his research in 69 peer reviewed publications and over 120 workshops, seminars and conference presentations, largely over the past 6 years. He has supervised 6 PhD candidates and 15 Honours students to graduation.

Bill is the co-ordinator for the coursework Master of Sports Physiotherapy program at the University of Queensland and teaches across undergraduate and postgraduate programs in musculoskeletal healthcare, focusing on lower limb and sports physiotherapy. He contributes to the publication of knowledge through service as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, as a member of the International Editorial Panel for Manual Therapy as well as an ad hoc reviewer to a number of sport and rehabilitation journals. He is also the UQ Chair of the Medical Research Ethics Committee and Chair of the Physiotherapy Registration Board of Queensland.

 
 
 
Selected Recent Publications
 
Bisset L, Smidt N, Van der Windt DA, Bouter LM, Jull G, Brooks P, Vicenzino B. - ‘Conservative treatments for tennis elbow do subgroups of patients respond differently?’ - Rheumatology (Oxford). 2007 Oct;46(10):1601-5.

 
 
Chapman AR, Vicenzino B, Blanch P, Knox JJ, Dowlan S, Hodges PW. - ‘The influence of body position on leg kinematics and muscle recruitment during cycling’..J Sci Med Sport. 2007 Aug 23; [Epub ahead of print]
 
 
O'leary S, Falla D, Hodges PW, Jull G, Vicenzino B. - ‘Specific Therapeutic Exercise of the Neck Induces Immediate Local Hypoalgesia’. J Pain. 2007 Jul 18; [Epub ahead of print]
 
 
Chapman AR, Vicenzino B, Blanch P, Hodges PW. - ‘Leg muscle recruitment during cycling is less developed in triathletes than cyclists despite matched cycling training loads’. Exp Brain Res. 2007 Aug;181(3):503-18. Epub 2007 Jun 5.
 
 
Chapman AR, Vicenzino B, Blanch P, Dowlan S, Hodges PW. - ‘Does cycling effect motor coordination of the leg during running in elite triathletes?’ J Sci Med Sport. 2007 Apr 25; [Epub ahead of print]
 
 
Vicenzino B. - ‘Physiotherapy for tennis elbow’. Evid Based Med. 2007 Apr;12(2):37-8.
 
 
Collins N, Bisset L, McPoil T, Vicenzino B. - ‘Foot orthoses in lower limb overuse conditions: a systematic review and meta-analysis’. Foot Ankle Int. 2007 Mar;28(3):396-412. Review.
 
 
Franettovich MM, McPoil TG, Russell T, Skardoon G, Vicenzino B. - ‘The ability to predict dynamic foot posture from static measurements’. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2007 Mar-Apr;97(2):115-20.
 
Falla D, Jull G, Russell T, Vicenzino B, Hodges P. - ‘Effect of neck exercise on sitting posture in patients with chronic neck pain’. Phys Ther. 2007 Apr;87(4):408-17. Epub 2007 Mar 6.
 
 
O'Leary S, Jull G, Kim M, Vicenzino B. - ‘Specificity in retraining craniocervical flexor muscle performance’. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2007 Jan;37(1):3-9.
 
 
Jull G, Falla D, Treleaven J, Hodges P, Vicenzino B. - ‘Retraining cervical joint position sense: the effect of two exercise regimes’. J Orthop Res. 2007 Mar;25(3):404-12.
 
 
Chapman AR, Vicenzino B, Blanch P, Hodges PW. - ‘Patterns of leg muscle recruitment vary between novice and highly trained cyclists’. J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2007 Jan 25; [Epub ahead of print]