Event Details

Date:
Friday, 01 December 2017
Time:
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Room:
Room 219
UQ Location:
Human Movement Studies Building (St Lucia)
Event category(s):

Event Contact

Name:
Ms Sally Goodwin
Phone:
3365 6764
Email:
s.goodwin1@uq.edu.au
Org. Unit:
Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences

Event Description

Full Description:
Title: 'Why are newly-published exercise guidelines for adults with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) different from the ESSA position statement on exercise and SCI?' and 'Physical activity in school: Stealth interventions and lessons from a local initiative'

Dr Sean Tweedy will present - Why are newly-published exercise guidelines for adults with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) different from the ESSA position statement on exercise and SCI? New exercise guidelines for adults with spinal cord injury (SCI) have been published and there are important differences between them and the recently published Exercise and Sports Science Australia (ESSA) Position Statement on exercise and SCI, including:
- the volume of aerobic exercise recommended by ESSA is 150min of moderate intensity exercise (MIE)/wk, considerably larger than the NG, which recommend at least 40min of MIE/wk (fitness benefits) or at least 90min of MIE/wk (cardiometabolic health benefit);
- the NG recommendations are presented as “minimum thresholds”, implying that sub-threshold volumes will not confer fitness/health benefits. In contrast, ESSA recognises that many “Beginning Clients” will initially be unable to safely meet the recommended volume and these clients will derive benefit from very small, progressive increases in exercise volume (e.g. 5min/day).

This paper will posit that the NG are based on a misinterpretation of the scientific evidence, that their promotion may have unintended adverse consequences and that that ESSA recommendations stand scrutiny, being based on a defensible, balanced consideration of the best available evidence.

Dr Michalis Stylianou and Dr Sjaan Gomersall - will present Physical activity in school: Stealth interventions and lessons from a local initiative.

Increasing physical activity in children and young people is often identified as a public health priority. Accordingly, governments spend large sums of money on physical activity initiatives and interventions. However, these interventions, including school-based interventions, generally demonstrate small effects on physical activity outcomes (Dobbins et al., 2013; Metcal et al., 2012) and their sustainability beyond the research phase is limited (or ignored). Stealth interventions, which focus on process motivation and place the target behavior as a side effect of the intervention, have been proposed as a promising approach in promoting health behaviours such as physical activity (Robinson, 2010).

This presentation will draw on data from a project examining a school-based physical activity initiative and will identify target behaviours that are motivating in themselves for school stakeholders, and particularly children and teachers. The presentation will also consider key factors that emerge from the particular project as key for the success of school-based physical activity initiatives and will discuss potential strategies that can facilitate the sustainability of relevant interventions/initiatives.

Directions to UQ

Google Map:
Directions:
To St Lucia Campus, UQ Ipswich, and UQ Gatton.

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